Connecticut Law Review Volume 48 - Issue 1

Self Defense Against Robots and Drones

Robots can pose—or can appear to pose—a threat to life, property, and privacy. May a landowner legally shoot down a trespassing drone? Can she hold a trespassing autonomous car as security against damage done or further torts? Is the fear that a drone may be operated by a paparazzo or Peeping Tom sufficient grounds to […]

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A Reform Agenda Premised upon the Reciprocal Relationship Between Anti-LGBT Bias in Role Model Occupations and the Bullying of LGBT Youth

Employment discrimination in role model occupations on the basis of LGBT status has long been used systematically to define negatively the LGBT identity and to reinforce the associations between the non-LGBT majority and certain positive qualities, values, and institutions. This Article argues that a reciprocal relationship exists between such discrimination and the bullying of LGBT […]

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Opening the “Snake Pit”: Arming Teachers in the War Against School Violence and the Government-Created Risk Doctrine

In the aftermath of the horrific school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, parents, students, and school administrators began to fear the unthinkable—that a violent, ruthless criminal could invade their school campuses and randomly target innocent youth. Even though statistics show that violent crime in elementary and secondary schools is on the […]

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Transparency and Transmission: Theorizing Information’s Role in Regulatory and Market Responses to Workplace Problems

This Essay develops a comprehensive theory of the role of information in regulatory and market responses to workplace problems. Existing legal and economic scholarship has focused narrowly on transparency mandates that reveal facts about the hidden conditions of work—for example, the health risks to which workers are exposed without their knowledge, or undisclosed pay differentials […]

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Modernism and Antimodernism in the Federal Courts: Reflections on the Federal District Court for the District of Connecticut on the 100th Anniversary of Its New Haven Courthouse

The story of the federal courthouse on the New Haven Green is a perfect parable for the modern history of the federal district courts around the country. One hundred years ago, architect James Gamble Rogers built a post office with a courtroom attached as an afterthought. In the century since, the United States has built […]

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New York City, New Haven, and the New Mobile Food Trends: An Analysis of Local Law and Culture in Response to the Reawakening of Mobile Food

In recent years, mobile food vending has become increasingly popular in part due to a developing “foodie” culture and the lingering effects of the 2007 economic recession. While the mobile food business model provides clear benefits for entrepreneurs and consumers alike, communities throughout the nation are divided into pro- and anti-vendor groups in response to […]

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The Open Our Democracy Act: A Proposal for Effective Election Reform

Commentators on opposite ends of the American political spectrum do not often agree on much, but one common source of frustration in recent years has been the perceived shortcomings of the Congressional election system. In 2014, Representative John Delaney of Maryland introduced a bill in the House of Representatives that seeks to remedy some of […]

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