Volume 40 Symposium (2007-08): Unconscious Discrimination Twenty Years Later

Twenty years ago, Professor Charles Lawrence wrote one of the most influential pieces in critical race theory, entitled The Id, The Ego, and Equal Protection: Reckoning with Unconscious Racism. Professor Lawrence noted that the purposeful intent requirements found in antidiscrimination laws failed to provide adequate protection because many forms of racial bias are unconscious. He argued that laws should be reformed to encompass more subtle forms of discrimination. More recently, scholars have applied the notion of unconscious discrimination to other areas of the law, including gender and disability bias.

This fall, The Connecticut Law Review hosted a Symposium focusing on the twentieth anniversary of Professor Lawrence’s piece. The Symposium drew together a multidisciplinary group of academics, practitioners, and community activists to discuss the evolution of Professor Lawrence’s piece. It also looked at the psychological studies that Professor Lawrence’s work encouraged and will examine the influence of his theory on “unconscious racism” twenty years later. Panelists discussed the application of his theory to a variety of practice areas such as criminal justice, employment discrimination, and juvenile law. Featured speakers included: Prof. Charles Lawrence, Prof. Mari Matsuda, Prof. Gowri Ramachandran, Hon. Janet Bond Arterton, Prof. Catherine Smith, Prof. Amy Wax, Prof. Samuel Bagenstos, Prof. Devon Carbado, Prof. Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, Prof. James Forman Jr., Prof. Elizabeth Emens, Prof. John Tehranian, and Ms. Eva Jefferson-Paterson.

The Symposium was held on November 2, 2007 in Starr Hall at the University of Connecticut School of Law. Information about the symposium, as well as copies of the Symposium Edition of the Law Review, may be obtained by calling 860-570-5331 or e-mailing connlrev@law.uconn.edu.

SCHEDULE
Friday, November 2, 2007

Welcome Breakfast
8:15 a.m.

Opening Remarks
8:45 a.m.
Jeremy Paul
Dean and Thomas F. Gallivan, Jr. Professor of Real Property Law, University of Connecticut School of Law

Keynote Address
Charles R. Lawrence
Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

MP3 recording of opening remarks and first keynote address

Break
9:45 a.m.-10:00 p.m.

Panel One
10:00 a.m.-11:20 p.m.
Evolution of The Id, the Ego, and Equal Protection

Moderated by
Loftus Becker
Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law

Panelists

Mari J. Matsuda
Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

Gowri Ramachandran
Associate Professor of Law, Southwestern Law School

Catherine Smith
Professor of Law, University of Denver, Sturm College of Law

Hon. Janet Bond Arterton
United States District Judge, District of Connecticut

MP3 recording of first panel discussion

Panel Two
The Intersection of Law and Psychology
11:20 a.m.-12:40 p.m.

Moderated by
Peter Siegelman
Roger Sherman Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law

Panelists

Samuel Bagenstos
Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development, Washington University School of Law

Devon Carbado
Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Valerie Purdie-Vaughns
Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale University

MP3 recording of second panel discussion

Lunch
12:40p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Luncheon Keynote Address
Amy Wax
Robert Mundheim Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School

Introduction by
Jeremy Paul
Dean and Thomas F. Gallivan, Jr. Professor of Real Property Law, University of Connecticut School of Law

MP3 recording of second keynote address

Break
2:00 p.m.-2:10 p.m.

Panel Three
Applying Unconscious Discrimination
2:10p.m.-3:50 p.m.

Moderated by
Kaaryn Gustafson
Associate Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law

Panelists

James Forman, Jr.
Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

John Tehranian
Professor of Law, University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law

Eva Jefferson-Paterson
President, Equal Justice Society

Elizabeth F. Emens
Associate Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

Natasha Martin
Associate Professor of Law, Seattle University School of Law

Closing Remarks
3:50 p.m.

MP3 recording of third panel discussion and closing remarks

Posted in Uncategorized |