Connecticut Law Review Volume 47 - Issue 2

An Empirical Analysis of Diversity in the Legal Profession

The purpose of this Study is to empirically examine the diversity of the legal profession. The primary distinctive features of this empirical analysis are that it evaluates diversity in the legal profession by (a) carefully comparing it against other prestigious professions that have significant barriers to entry, and (b) focusing on young individuals who recently […]

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Trans-Personal Procedures

Recent court decisions have reignited a national debate about corporate personhood. This debate recognizes that the legal status of artificial persons is of great importance to the fabric of society, law, and politics. Questions about the status of artificial persons are typically raised in the context of substantive law, where corporate personhood has triggered strong […]

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The Fourth Zone of Presidential Power: Analyzing the Debt-Ceiling Standoffs Through the Prism of Youngstown Steel

In this Article, I use the Youngstown Steel Seizure Case to assess the reoccurring debt-ceiling standoffs between Congress and the White House. If the Treasury reaches the debt limit and Congress fails to act, the president will be forced to choose between three options: (1) cancel programs, (2) borrow funds in excess of the debt […]

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Formerly Manufacturing Entities: Piercing the “Patent Troll” Rhetoric

Everyone hates patent trolls—those companies that “hijack somebody else’s idea” and use the patents to “extort some money” from companies that actually make things. But, despite the rhetoric, not all patent trolls are created equal. This Article is the first to focus on one type of patent troll— the formerly manufacturing entity. These patent trolls […]

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State’s Rights, Last Rites, and Voting Rights

There are two ways to read the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County Alabama v. Holder: as a minimalist decision or as a decision that undermines the basic infrastructure of voting rights policy, law, and jurisprudence. In this Article, we present the case for reading Shelby County as deeply destabilizing. We argue that Shelby County […]

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Law & Science: Toward a Unified Field

To be relevant to the real world and to have a reasonable chance of producing fair outcomes, legal and political decisionmaking must take science into account. Scholars have been aware of this for over fifty years. The need for law to be informed by rigorous science is compelling, as we must make collective decisions that […]

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Breaking Down BEPS: Strategies, Reforms, and Planning Responses

In response to a call from the G20 to address perceived aggressive international tax planning strategies, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development initiated its Base Erosion and Profit Shifting project in 2012. The project’s flagship document provided a broad outline of the path to reform current international tax norms and highlighted several specifically disfavored […]

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